BRISBANE FLIGHT ARRIVALS. FLIGHT ARRIVALS


BRISBANE FLIGHT ARRIVALS. CHEAP AIRFARE TO BRUSSELS



Brisbane Flight Arrivals





brisbane flight arrivals






    brisbane
  • capital and largest city of Queensland state; located in the southeastern corner of Queensland on the Pacific; settled by British as a penal colony; 3rd largest city in Australia

  • (in  Albert Brisbane (American philosopher))

  • Brisbane is a lunar crater that is located in the southeastern part of the Moon, to the south of the crater Peirescius. To the northwest lie the craters Vega and Reimarus, and farther to the east is the walled plain Lyot.

  • The capital of Queensland, Australia; pop. 1,273,500. It was founded in 1824 as a penal colony





    arrivals
  • Imported goods that have been placed in a bonded warehouse because their duty has not yet been paid.

  • The emergence or appearance of a new development, phenomenon, or product

  • Number of arrivals at a selected airport or group of airports.

  • Ashland, OR: Story Line Press, 2004.

  • The action or process of arriving

  • A person who has arrived somewhere





    flight
  • Shoot (wildfowl) in flight

  • (in soccer, cricket, etc.) Deliver (a ball) with well-judged trajectory and pace

  • shoot a bird in flight

  • an instance of traveling by air; "flying was still an exciting adventure for him"

  • a formation of aircraft in flight











David Gower and John Morris pose after buzzing the ground-England vs Queensland Cararra Oval 1991




David Gower and John Morris pose after buzzing the ground-England vs Queensland Cararra Oval 1991





There was something rather ironic about David Gower and John Morris sharing the same birthday - April Fool's Day. For it was during the 1990-91 Ashes tour that the pair of them decided to have what Gower described as "a little bit of fun", which almost ended in them being sent back home in disgrace.



England were not enjoying the best of series, two-down after three Tests, although Gower was in superb personal form with hundreds in both the second and third Tests. The squad then slipped to defeat against New South Wales before heading for a match against Queensland at the Carrara Oval, a venue on the Gold Coast some 50 miles south of Brisbane. But at last they showed form in the game, which was to provide them with their only first-class win of the trip, and on the third day, Morris, whose opportunities had been limited, completed a hundred before getting out within minutes of Gower shortly before lunch.


All the players were aware of the biplanes flying high above the ground throughout the match, and they were also aware that the airfield was nearby. At the break Gower mentioned to Allan Lamb and Robin Smith that he fancied a flight, and Morris, who overheard, eagerly asked to be included in any arrangements. "I did think of asking Graham [Gooch, England's captain]," admitted Gower, "but I knew he would be unhappy with us flying, and as that was the entire point of the exercise, I decided it was best not to mention it at all."


The airport was close enough to reach in a few minutes, and also to ensure that were England, four-down at the time, to collapse then the pair would be back in time to field. On arrival, they had to wait for a flight on the aptly-named Joy-Ride company's planes, but after checking that Smith and Lamb were still batting, they each climbed into a pre-war Tiger Moth and took off.


Gower had already persuaded his pilot to indulge in some low flying - the planes were supposed to stay over 2000 feet but in the event they buzzed the Oval at nearer 200. They dipped down moments after Smith completed his own hundred and Lamb, who knew who was in them, playfully pretended to shoot them down with his bat. No-one else was any the wiser.


However, one of the pilots had tipped off the press before take-off, and Adrian Murrell, a photographer covering the trip, thought he recognised the passengers through a telephoto lens. By the time they landed, there was a reception committee.


When Gower and Morris sneaked back into the dressing-room, Gooch asked: "That wasn't you two up there by any chance, was it?" Gower recalled that he "put on my best choirboy face and said something like: 'Who, me? Heavens, no'." But events were quickly moving on.


The press corps had been alerted (for a time stories did the rounds that Gower had considered dropping a water bomb on the pitch) and they asked Peter Lush, the team manager, for a comment. He was livid and immediately went to confront the two aviators. But by this time they were back at the airport posing for another photographer, Graham Morris, who had missed the fly-by pictures.


When Morris returned to the hotel he was, to quote Gower, "ambushed by a steaming Lush in the lobby who demanded to know what had been going on ... John Morris puffed in shortly afterwards and was pounced on by this human volcano." Lush wanted an immediate inquiry. Gower, however, inadvertently raised the manager's blood pressure several more notches - he had gone out to dinner.



Morris rang Gower at the restaurant and warned him trouble was brewing and said Lush wanted to see him immediately. Gower, almost inevitably, was not about to abandon dinner and a bottle of 1987 McLaren Vale Chardonnay to be chastised as if he was a naughty schoolboy. He returned to the hotel to find three notes from Lush, each one increasingly irate, summoning him to an 8.15am hearing.


Gower and Morris were faced with a stony-faced panel consisting of Gooch, Lush, Lamb and Mickey Stewart, the coach. Stewart kicked off by complaining he had had to get up early, and it went downhill from there on in. "You can either be heavy about it or you can treat it as harmless prank," Gower told them. No guessing which they chose. But Gooch then questioned Gower's commitment and a heated discussion ensued.


Common sense would suggest that the senior player should have privately be told not to be such a fool and that the less-experienced Morris should have been given a sharp reprimand. But that was not the way England functioned back then. "What followed was reflective of the attitude at that time," Gower recalled. "Gooch and Stewart were very regimental in their dealings at the time. It was a one-rule-for-all-types regime, which didn't allow someone to have a little bit of fun."


The pair were fined ?1000 each, the maximum allowed under their contracts, which made no distinction between senior and junior











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JPAU14DEC04PC414.JPG ARH Commisioning
14/12/2004
Photo by Able Seaman Phillip Cullinan

Two Australian Army "Tiger" Armed Reconnaissance Helicopters on their inaugural flight as part of the Australian Defence Force.

Deep Caption

The Australian Army has taken delivery of its first two Tiger Armed Reconnaissance Helicopters, also known as the ARH, at a ceremony at Oakey in Queensland.

Acquired under Project AIR87, there will eventually be 22 Eurocopter Tigers in service. They will be flown by 161 and 162 Reconnaissance Squadrons of the 1st Aviation Regiment based in Townsville and Darwin and the Army Aviation Training Centre at Oakey.

Its arrival and introduction into service will greatly enhance both the reconnaissance and fire-support capabilities of Army, operating by day or night, and will provide a vital capability to escort and protect other air and ground assets.









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